Soeks Nitrate Tester 2 - Reviews
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by Wawrzyniec Borkowski Date Added: Wednesday 19 February, 2014
I got it at last! Checked the garden apples – just 20, but the onions exceed the rate. I was particularly disappointed with the potatoes I bought with private sellers – high content of nitrates... Thus we take on trust …. Quite a useful thing!

Rating: 5 of 5 Stars! [5 of 5 Stars!]
by Nal Molar Date Added: Sunday 23 December, 2012
I’m using the SOEKs nitrate tester for 2 months. I checked a water-melon a few days ago - 600 mg/kg. It weighed about 12 kilos. It’s a great gage, when you have small kids it is an absolute must in your house.

Rating: 5 of 5 Stars! [5 of 5 Stars!]
by Irina Sokolova Date Added: Sunday 02 December, 2012
I have been missing the nitrate-tester for quite a while, but it wasn’t on sale. Now I have it – I needed to know what exactly we eat in family. That’s what I saw and infer. I measured almost all the vegetables, fruits and meat bought at Achan and Almi (a small supermarket) in Moscow. 90% of the products checked showed either the highest rate allowed, or exceeded it. Only potatoes and carrots were normal or below. BUT: the first had all insides grey and the last were half-dried. Such uniform results made me doubt the device reliability. But when we came back to Cyprus a week ago (we are leaving there most of the time), and stocked up at a store, I couldn’t help checking all of course. Here’s the result: almost all of the products had a twice-below norm content. Note: the whole of them are locally grown. Except pears that were brought from Italy. They showed red – one cannot eat. So the tester works perfectly. But for the Russians buying food without checking it is similar to buying the pig in a poke. As for us in Cyprus, I’ll keep to the abundance of local fresh vegetables and fruits. No more Italian pears, thank you. Still I can’t help but wonder: what a shit is grown on our native fertile land? Should only Moscow supermarkets be stuffed with a non-edible food? Why in Cyprus with its sand and stones around they grow and sell healthy products?

Rating: 5 of 5 Stars! [5 of 5 Stars!]
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